Thursday, 6 February 2020

WRITING ABOUT INFLUENTIAL WOMEN


Mary Edith Pechey and Marie Curie were two of the most influential women of their times. Marie Curie conducted significant research on radioactivity as well as being the only person to win a Nobel prize in two different sciences. Edith Pechey was one of the first female doctors in the United Kingdom and a promoter of women’s rights. Both women were contrapuntal to the development of the human race, but what would happen if their lives were thrown off track? 

Paul Robinson takes a small hiatus from his Charlie Holmes series to write Time Split, a new novel following the adventures of Jenny Johnson. Jenny finds herself launched into the bodies of two teenage girls in the past. She must ensure that they are set back onto the correct paths to secure their future influences, and the success of humanity!

Inspired by a writing exercise, Paul created Time Split after receiving the prompt “One day she woke up…”. He combined this with his expansive knowledge of famous women throughout history -– of which he has a list -– in order to raise more awareness of their achievements.

Paul explains: “I am a strong believer in writing about important female characters. I want to readdress the balance between the genders while teaching younger girls about amazing, influential women.”

Having taught young people for the past 40 years, including working with those hard of hearing, Paul’s main aspiration is to develop new role models in order to inspire his students. He aims to create more relatable and exceptional characters; Charlie Holmes is based on one of his deaf students, Charlotte.

Time Split encapsulates adolescence in a realistic way, with a generous serving of miscommunication, humour, love and heartbreak.

If you like to publish a YA or children's book with us and take control visit: www.jellybeanselfpublishing.co.uk

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